Technically Writing With Purpose

(Inspired by a writing prompt from The Daily Post)

One of the things I love about technical writing is the ability to write without having to resort to flowery language. While embellishing an email or newsletter is fun on occasion, I do not need to tell a story in a user manual. The only epic journey involved in furniture assembly involves a trip to IKEA  during a holiday weekend. My purpose in creating documentation often involves explaining something, and then removing half the words in the hopes that users will be less scared by a 50 page manual than a 100 page manual (do not be scared reader, I have graphics!) While I am exaggerating a bit, there is a reason you will never see this in a user manual:

You are advised to enter as many search fields as possible, for when accessing the seemingly infinite cosmos of data records, a broad search may bring thousands, nay, tens of thousands of results! While one could seek the aid of “alphabetical” or “recently added” sorting options, the daunting task of filtering so many records is certain to bring you to your knees after reaching page four of four hundred with not even the slightest hint of your beloved result in sight. So beware, dear reader, always enter at least two or three search terms, least you find yourself staring directly into the abyss.

Instead, I would write something like this: Enter additional search criteria if too many search results appear.

My purpose in technical writing is often to explain, not to reveal anything about myself. This might sound odd to the student tasked with providing original thought and justification, but even in creative writing a little brevity (and a little less preposition use) can go a long way. Your editor will thank you later.

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