Category Archives: Book Reviews

Goodreads Quick Review: Raising Steam

Raising Steam (Discworld, #40, Moist von Lipwig #3 )Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Although technically a Moist Von Lipwig novel, this read more like a “farewell to Discworld” novel. With the arrival of the steam engine, a lot of page space is dedicated to Discworld characters discussing, riding, or fighting atop the locomotive…in some cases all three at once.

The plot is relatively tame, and constantly interrupted with irrelevant cameo scenes from Discworld characters across its storied history making one final appearance. The central conflict is mostly subdued and then quickly dispatched with some hit you over the head moral lessons about fantastic racism along the way.

While this is a good novel, it is not much of a Moist novel, which I find disappointing because I love Moist. Still, as the final “complete” Discworld novel it does provide a nice ending to Ankh-Morpork and its crazy cast.

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Goodreads Quick Review: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire HunterAbraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter portrays itself as a truth-seeking biography of Lincoln’s life…specifically that he was actually a paranoid maniac who wanted to hunt down all the evil vampires because they killed his mommy. And because all vampires are evil…except the few that are not.

Hey, at least they aren’t good sparkly vampires.

This is not a good book, and for that I am very disappointed. Abraham Lincoln hunts vampires – how can you go wrong? With clumsy writing and horrible pacing for starters. Put simply, the plot takes a long time to get going, and once you get to the part of the story where things should get really good (The Civil War, which is naturally a vampire plot to enslave all humans) you are over three-quarters of the way through the book. Long stretches of time are devoted to Lincoln rambling about his hatred of vampires, or characters that do not deserve it (John Wilkes Booth who is, surprise surprise, a vampire, could have had his own novel)

If you want to portray Abraham Lincoln has a super cool vampire hunter, then you need to abandon your inhibitions and take no punches with your writing. Unfortunately the author seems nervous about tackling one of the most famous figures in America, and the end result leaves poor Mr. Lincoln a shell of a man.

One tip if you decide to read the book: skip the prologue. It can be safely ignored, and as a framing device (though I hesitate to label it such) it is never brought back at the end.

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Goodreads Quick Review: Proven Guilty

Proven Guilty (The Dresden Files, #8)Proven Guilty by Jim Butcher
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I can always count on Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files for an enjoyable (and memorable) read. While Proven Guilty is no exception with its avalanche of movie monsters, fairy monsters, and courtroom drama, it simply lacks the punch of Dead Beat and the last few books. The intense life and death struggles are still here…they are just sandwiched between a lot of drama.

While I give Butcher some credit for playing with the formula a little bit, it could have done with about 50 less pages of Harry’s existentialism over trying to be the perfect hero (we get it, you feel bad about recent events, you can stop reminding us every other page) and his sudden desire to act on his Murphy feelings (lets not kid ourselves, we all knew how round one of this was going to end). The extra pages gained could have helped him on the rushed trial sequence at the end.

Speaking of sudden, I give Butcher extra credit for creative use of divine intervention. Every time a Knight of the Cross story comes up, I always fear a cop out in the form of “he works in mysterious ways.” This book does a wonderful job of playing with the concept, so perhaps I should stop worrying and love the Butcher.

Don’t let the three stars and review fool you. The sharp writing and clever humor remain intact and I enjoyed the book. But if I compare it to previous books in the series, it just lacks the Forzare! of previous books.

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Goodreads Quick Review: Mortis

MortisMortis by Hannah Cobb

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Mortis delivers just the sort of tale you would expect about an honor-driven underground school of child assassins-in-training. The plot is sneaky, and at times purposefully deceptive, but nonetheless fairly written.

The story revolves around Jane, a student with the special power to turn invisible in any conditions short of broad daylight. She could use this power, along with her excellent stealth and combat skills, to rise to the top of her class and become a true name to be feared among the Master Assassins, those who graduate from Mortis. Instead, she adopts the moniker of the mouse and purposefully hides her abilities as an average student. Ironic, as while everyone in Mortis may view her as nothing special, her ability to perfectly blend in as average while secretly possessing great talent technically makes her superior to the assassins who flaunt their power.

This fact does not go unnoticed by Jane’s two closest friends: Willy, a fiery spirit whose unpredictability can only be matched by her ability to find humor in the darkest moments, and Felix, the protective, skillful boy who constantly skirts the line of lawful stupid but never quite crosses it. Together these three form the power trio who wonder about the morality of raising orphans to become remorseless assassins.

As you go through the initial chapters you might be wondering why Jane has the unique power to turn invisible. You might also be wondering just what’s in that secret passage below the ship cavern, or Willy’s pointed secret, or why Thomas Wade has purple eyes and the ability to see through Jane’s invisibility. Don’t worry too much about these details. The book takes pride in keeping the reader in the dark, dangling details but never fully explaining them until it is necessary to strike. Annoying, but justified in keeping with the theme of a book about assassins. You’ll find out what you want to know as you need to know it.

I give the book credit for its rich world building – the author clearly took a long time developing the rich world of Mortis, and these details reveal themselves just like the plot points – on a need to know basis. Unfortunately this works against the book when it feels the need to deliver Mortis trivia during climactic moments. Thank you for describing the nursery at the end of the book, but I do believe we have more important matters to attend to.

I also praise the book for attempting to show the morality and ethics of the assassin’s art. This is not a happy-go-lucky anime where killing is seen as nothing special – the story takes time to dive into the realistic side-effects of what happens when a teenager is tasked with taking a life. Even if you’ve been trained to do it your entire life – theory is different than the reality of what lies before you.

Sometimes you have to make a critical decision. A decision that not only impacts you, but friends and strangers around you. The trick is, can you live with the decision of what you do (or do not do)?

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Goodreads Quick Review: Grave Peril

Grave Peril
Grave Peril by Jim Butcher
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The third entry into Jim Butcher’s paranormal-fantasy-detective series continues with another fresh entry. Well, this particular story isn’t “fresh” per-say as it deals with undead ghosts and vampires, but you know, good writing and whatnot.

This time around, Harry’s partner in crime Murphy is replaced with the modern templar Michael Carpenter (heh). The stories I heard about Butcher being an avid Dungeons and Dragons player are clearly true. Michael is quite literally a classic Dungeons and Dragons lawful good paladin stuck in modern day America. Place Michael with the agnostic Harry as they battle a supernatural threat, and Butcher can virtually abandon any plans he has for this series and make his own fun version of hit-TV show Supernatural.

There’s also Susan, Harry’s new beau with whom I am sadly forced to dock a star. Chalk it up to a classic case of rushed relationship pacing if you will, but the chemistry between Susan and Harry simply wasn’t up to par with the chemistry between Harry and pretty much every other character. Even two-scene-wonder Thomas, who would have stolen the show in any other book.

In the Harry Dresden universe, assertion is meaningless unless you have the skills to back it up. Perhaps Butcher realized this as well because…well…let’s just say I don’t share Harry’s state of mind at the end of the book. For me it’s more of a “Thank Go-err goodness that’s over with.” (Sorry Michael) Speaking of moving on, Butcher continues subtly laying the groundwork for a grand story arc in what appears to be pretty stand-alone stories at first glance.

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Goodreads Quick Review: Fool Moon

Fool Moon
Fool Moon by Jim Butcher
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Butcher’s second entry in the Dresden Files once again shows promise for a great long-running series. Once again someone is in trouble, but this time around danger comes in the form of werewolves instead of freak meteorology.

Every world-building writer has their own ideas on how fantasy elements like werewolves work. Butcher quickly explains Dresden Files lycanthropy in a concise and well-written info dump courtesy of everyone’s favorite perverted skull while Dresden gets to work. The werewolf angle works well, but I’m really tired of all fantasy writers’ need to make supernatural creatures condescending towards the human race. Humans are stupid, pointlessly violent, and so on…we get it.

I recently stumbled upon an interview in which the first few Dresden Files books came about because Butcher, in getting frustrated with his writing professor, finally broke down and wrote something he considered “boring and formulaic.” While this book is formulaic (a lot more so than Storm Front), it certainly isn’t boring.

Is that a bad thing? I don’t think so. Butcher seems content to play along with the formula for now, but the end of story allusion that much deeper threats (and stories) are on the horizon will keep me coming back for more.

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Goodreads Quick Review: Redshirts

Redshirts
Redshirts by John Scalzi
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

At first glance, Redshirts looks like an obvious parody of the Star Trek red shirts. Specifically, the poor nameless extras whose only purpose is to die horribly at the hands of whatever threat the important crew officers encounter. And…well that’s actually the entire point. Literally.

This book is what happens when the red shirts become self-aware. For as it so happens, the red shirt heroes soon realize that they actually are part of a science fiction TV show narrative that exists in the real world. A not-unlike-Star Trek narrative where the Captain, Science Officer, Lieutenant, and so on always survive the most dangerous of ordeals time and time again while the ensign red shirt are left to perish.

What follows is a hilarious and crazy-awesome adventure whose sheer mind-screwiness plays basketball with the timey-wimey ball of Doctor Who fame. Suffice to say, if you are a Star Trek (original series) fan or a lover of lighthearted science fiction, you will enjoy this book. A few words of literary warning: this book is *extremely* dialogue-heavy. If you like your conversations broken up with consistant action, you may get annoyed as the book moves on.

Bonus points for having a brilliant ending, and I mean “the last two pages” kind of brilliant. Plus, given the overall comedic scope, the final epilogue sequence is inexplicably heartwarming. Grab some tissues beforehand. Scalzi ties everything together, beginning and end and everything beyond, through the skillful words of a veteran writer.

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