Tag Archives: english literature

Goodreads Quick Review: The Etiquette of Engagement and Marriage Describing Modern Manners and Customs of Courtship and Marriage

The Etiquette of Engagement and Marriage Describing Modern Manners and Customs of Courtship and Marriage, and Giving Full Details Regarding the
The Etiquette of Engagement and Marriage Describing Modern Manners and Customs of Courtship and Marriage by G.R.M. Devereux
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I came across this little piece while browsing wedding-planning tips on my Kindle. The book fancies itself a modern-day guide for the bride and groom (with a slight preference directed at the former) written by someone who grew up writing with the Bronte sisters or Jane Austen. Put simply, this a wedding planner designed like a 200-Level English Literature survey-style college course.

Tips are given throughout every phase of the engagement, from the proposal to after-wedding advice. A few sections also cover weddings in other countries which, although interesting, tend to slow down the narrative. Including the international tips in a separate appendix at the end of the book would have worked much better.

Although written with a British audience in mind, a good amount of the material applies equally well to American audiences. Unfortunately, if you won’t touch Pride and Prejudice with a 10-foot pole you may find the flowery wording too difficult to follow. The writer clearly holds some knowledge about the marriage process, and this knowledge is dispensed with thought-provoking quotes certain to cause debate in book clubs everywhere.

For the low cost of $0 it was a nice quick read (just over 100 pages), but I wouldn’t recommend shelling out shillings for it.

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Unlearning the Essay

I’ve mentioned before that I’m not a big fan of the English Literature degree. Here’s another reason why I believe it inadequate preparation for most professional careers:

The 1,000 2,000 3,000 any number above 350 words essay.

Every English Literature class requires the essay, an overly long piece of writing that accomplishes three goals:

  1. Prove that you actually read the required material and pay attention in class.
  2. Prove that you are capable of coming up with a clever and sophisticated argument.
  3. Prove that you can analyze scholarly essays by using an overly complex system of citation (MLA, APA, or Chicago, pick one) and pretending to sound original.

These points hold merit in developing skills you will use in the real world. Yet the execution demanded by English Literature professors through this essay holds no merit whatsoever. An essay is a long drawn out series of black words on white pages. For scholars and professors this boring presentation is fascinating. In the real world, your thousands of words will go ignored.

Real-World Example: In the ecommerce world I work in, if I want to make my point to a customer I not only require a nice design, I also require brevity in words. I can, and often must write a product description in less than 350 words (one standard page). If I go beyond this length, prospective customers  must scroll down excessively, and I risk them losing retained information and interest in the product. Essays often require at least 5-10 pages, usually more on the upper levels of literature classes. I can count the number of times I’ve written something that long at work on one hand. And I can spare a few fingers in the process.

Whew, that was a long paragraph. Still with me? My point is, although commonly used and hated by students everywhere, the long essay is too frequently used in the college level. Students need to learn to be brief and make their points quickly. Their future bosses don’t want an introductory paragraph, thesis statement, support, and conclusion. They just want the thesis statement.

Incidentally, the essay also fails in a design standpoint as well. If I used any of the above formatting tricks in a paper in college I’d lose points. Yet they actually help me design my information, which technical writers need to consider when drafting a document. If technical writers designed all of their documents like essays, they would not get very far. My blog design is white letters on a black background for a reason.

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The Evolving English Degree (I.E. What you *can* do with a BA in English)

A long time ago (2007) in a community college far away (about 20 minutes from my house), I took a class trip to attend a Broadway production of Avenue Q. The opening number of the play was “What do you do with a B.A. in English?” Given that I was about to finish my associate degree in English I found this song highly amusing, partly because it was true…at the time the play debuted.

The truth is I’m not a big fan of the classic English degree. I, a holder of a B.A. in English, should clarify. I hate the English Literature degree. When I was finishing my community college days (I was a “attend community college for two years then transfer to a four-year school” student) I realized that, while I enjoyed reading old books and writing papers on them, I was not getting any real world skills. Unless you want to become a literature professor, knowledge of Chaucer and Melville will not help in a workplace setting. I wanted to continue developing my writing skills; however, I did not want to spend my valuable class time sitting in a circle talking about old books. I could attend a book club instead and save thousands of dollars.

Fortunately for people like me, colleges are seeing the need for non-literature based English classes. Writing as a professional skill is actually rather critical in the workplace. Mainly because of the following adage:

When writing skills are needed, it is often a lot easier to teach a writer (technical/business/niche workplace skill) than it is to teach (technical/business/niche workplace) people how to write.

The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) happens to be one such college. Their English degree consists of two mutually exclusive tracks: an English literature track, and a communications and technology track which develops skills applicable for both print and electronic media. Media students will use in the workplace. Going to UMBC and getting an English degree on the latter track was an easy choice for me. I found writing about the latest trends in technology infinitely more useful than writing about old books. Colleges all over the country are implementing similar additions to the English major. Additions reflecting the need to develop writing skills that directly apply to workplace settings. Considering the new challenges and opportunities in image brought forth by online and  social media, these additions are critical.

So when I say I have an English degree I mean just that – an English degree, not an English Literature degree. My workplace toolkit is not The Divine Comedy. I actually don’t have much classic literature experience at all. The English degree I hold is adaptable, it allows me to write my way into a job. Literally. My first real (and still current as of this writing) job after college involves maintaining a website for a medical device business. Although I did not know anything about medical equipment when I started, within a month I knew everything I needed to know because of the writing and analytical skills I developed. Now I can tell you how to hook up an ECG, or the difference between a otoscope and opthalmoscope. And all the while I write to convince doctors and healthcare professionals that they should buy this cool equipment from the company I work for. Obviously my medical experience does not permit me to perform an exam or open heart surgery. I am not a highly trained healthcare professional that attended years of brutal medical school. I simply fill a niche, yet essential role.

And there are tons of those roles out there. It is what technical writers do.

That is the awesome thing about being a technical writer. I can adapt. I wield a mean pen and do not need to quote ancient authors. I am not sure where my future careers will take me, though I am confident that I will be able to write my way into an enjoyable position. I acknowledge that on the grand scale of college degree usefulness English Literature is not bottom of the barrel. However, I will argue that an English Literature degree is archaic in today’s digital age. The English degree will always continue to be relevant as it quietly adapts to a constantly changing world. Eventually, the world will begin seeing this.

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